Psalm 28: To You, O Lord, I Call

(9 verses, 1:12 to read)

LISTEN & READ

What I am about to READ

  • David prays and is heard

MARK

  • David, based on God’s promise to hear our prayers, calls out to God (vv. 1-2).
  • David prays for deliverance from and against his enemies (vv. 3-5).
  • David praises God for hearing His prayer and delivering him from his enemies (vv. 6-9).

LEARN

  • God commands us to pray. If a Christian does not call upon God’s name in prayer, he is guilty of misusing the Lord’s name. Prayer is one of the reasons God gives us His name—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—in Holy Baptism. We also have a great promise from God that He will hear our prayers. Because of that, we need not fear any lack or death or hell.
  • David recognizes that he is not immune to the sins of those who surround him. Just like Isaiah confesses, “I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips.” This is dangerous for all Christians. We must guard our hearts and our minds from those things that would tempt us toward evil.
  • David’s enemies are hypocrites, speaking peace but carrying evil in their hearts. God, the one who renders judgment, sees into the hearts of sinful man. Thus our outward actions are not the only thing that is pleasing to God. Good works proceed from a heart that fears the Lord’s wrath and desires to do what He commands out love for God and neighbor.
  • David confesses where the strength to do God-pleasing works comes from: God alone. He is the strength of those whose hearts trust in Him. He saves His people, anointed by the Holy Spirit in the waters of Holy Baptism, enabling them, even in this life, to begin to fulfill the law of love. Even when we do fall short of God’s righteous law, Jesus, our Good Shepherd, bears us up and carries us by His saving power.
  • Luther links this psalm to the second and third commandments (prayer and worship) and the first and second petitions of the Lord’s Prayer.

MEDITATE

  • Prayer: God of all grace, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who knows the enemies of Your Church and are able to thwart all their designs; protect us against all tyrants, heretics, and hypocrites. Hear our prayer and grant us to love Your Word, to promote Your honor upon earth, and to continue in Your service always even to the end. Amen.

Thoughts? Comments? Questions? Post below, or join the conversation in our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dailybiblemeditation/

-Rev. Jordan McKinley, pastor
Trinity Lutheran Church, Vallonia, IN

Learn more about Trinity:
On the Web: http://www.trinityvallonia.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrinityVallonia
Twitter: @TrinityVallonia
Find our sermon podcasts through iTunes (Search “Trinity Vallonia”)
or at http://trinityvallonia.podbean.com/

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Psalm 27: The Lord is My Light and My Salvation

(14 verses, 1:55 to read)

What I am about to READ
  • This Psalm is a prayer of great confidence in the Lord in the midst of all sorts of trouble. It is one of the most comforting of all the Psalms.

MARK

  • The Psalm begins with a sermon extolling the Lord’s goodness, 27:1-6.
  • David then prays to the Lord asking for His help and kindness, 27:7-12.
  • The Psalm ends with a confession of faith (27:13) and a final charge (27:14).

LEARN

  • Consider the competing images of the Psalm. The Lord is a castle, a rock-solid protection in the time of trouble. In a wonderful mixing of images, David calls the tabernacle (only a tent, and certainly not a castle) his greatest protection. Our safety is in the Lord’s tent, not in the kings castle!
  • No matter the strength of our enemies, the Lord is our refuge and protector.
  • There is a lot of seeking in this Psalm. David is surrounded by his enemies, but he does not seek his own safety. Instead he seeks to dwell in the house of the Lord (27:4), and he seeks the Lord’s face (27:8). This is the hope that revives David, that he would see the “goodness of the Lord in the land of the living” (27:13).

MEDITATE

  • There are a number of beautiful verses to meditate on in this Psalm. Consider rereading especially verses 1, 4, 8-9, and 14.

The Lord is my light and my salvation;
whom shall I fear?
The Lord is the stronghold1 of my life;
of whom shall I be afraid?

Thoughts? Comments? Questions? Post below, or join the conversation in our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dailybiblemeditation/
-Pastor Bryan Wolfmueller

Psalm 25: David’s Prayer in Every Kind of Trouble

(22 verses, 1:55 to read)
What I am about to READ
  • David is praying with every trouble, asking the Lord for His help in trouble.

MARK

  • This Psalm is a partial acrostic; the first letter of each verse (almost) makes the Hebrew alphabet. (There are 22 letters in the Hebrew alphabet.)
  • Psalm 25 is difficult to categorize because there are so many various petitions, like the litany and the Lord’s Prayer.

LEARN

  • Notice how the Psalm moves from promise to petition. The prayers of David flow from the promises of God. This is wonderful instruction for our own prayers.

MEDITATE

  • Consider 25:14, and the phrase “friendship with God.”
  • Compare the petitions of this Psalm with seven petitions of the Lord’s Prayer. Can you find all seven petitions in this Psalm?
Thoughts? Comments? Questions? Post below, or join the conversation in our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dailybiblemeditation/
-Pastor Bryan Wolfmueller

Psalm 24: Lift Up Your Heads, O Gates

Originally posted by Pastor Flamme on September 26, 2014

(10 verses, 1:02 to read)

READ & LISTEN

What I am about to READ

  • This psalm points to the coming Messiah who will enter into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday.

MARK

  • All creation belongs to the Lord (1-2).
  • A Question is asked concerning the One who will stand in the presence of the Lord (3).
  • An Answer about the purity, honesty, and righteousness of this Man (4-6).
  • Praise for the King of Glory, the Lord of Hosts, who enters to overcome sin, death, and the devil (7-10).

LEARN

  • We pray this psalm in conjunction with Psalm Sunday.
  • All of creation is contrasted with the holy hill of the Lord. Not everyone can stand in the Lord’s presence upon the hill save Jesus who alone is sinless.

MEDITATE

  • Christ entered into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday to do battle with powers that hold us in bondage. Though his appearance was lowly and humble, the people thronged around him shouting, “Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the Name of the Lord.” Jesus came, not as a worldly war hero, but as a suffering servant. The Lord of Hosts shows his power in weakness. By his death he overcame death.

Thoughts? Comments? Questions? Post below, or join the conversation in our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dailybiblemeditation/

-Pastor A. Brian Flamme

Psalm 22: The Passion of the Christ

(31 verses, 3:28 to read)

LISTEN & READ

What I am about to READ

  • The Passion of Our Lord Jesus, According to St. David

MARK

  • The suffering Lord cries out in dereliction from the cross (vv. 1-22)
  • Christ praises His Father for rescuing Him from His enemies: death and hell (vv. 23-28)
  • After the death and resurrection of Christ are accomplished, the worship of God will consist of eating and proclaiming the works of God (vv. 29-31).

LEARN

  • Our Lord Christ prays this Psalm from the cross (see Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34).
  • The Holy Spirit inspired the Psalmist to write an astoundingly accurate picture of our Lord’s crucifixion.
  • Notice the theme of trust and deliverance that runs in this Psalm. This reminds us that the promises of God are sure. This is one of the ways in which Scripture benefits us. We see God make a promise, and we see how this promise plays out in the life of God’s people. These are examples for us so that our faith in God’s promises is not baseless.
  • This Psalm also proves true what St. Peter says in Acts 3:18, saying, “what God foretold by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ would suffer, he thus fulfilled.”
  • Here, we also see a prophecy about the proclamation of the Gospel going into all the world, even to a people yet unborn (v. 30-31). This Gospel is the righteousness of God, which He has accomplished for us sinners. Notice the reference to eating that accompanies the worship in v. 29. The Lutheran Confessions teach that to receive the gifts of God is the highest act of worship. This includes eating the Lord’s Supper!
  • Martin Luther categorizes this Psalm with the 1st Commandment and the 1stand 2nd Petitions of the Lord’s Prayer.

MEDITATE

  • Lord Jesus, Lamb of the Father’s own choosing, who offered Yourself a bloody sacrifice for our sins on the Place of Skulls, receive our thanks for Your love beyond measure. Let Your wounds be the solace of our hearts, and Your merits the ornaments of our souls in life and death, that, with Your perfected saints on high, we may forever sing Your praise. Amen.

Thoughts? Comments? Questions? Post below, or join the conversation in our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dailybiblemeditation/

-Rev. Jordan McKinley, pastor
Trinity Lutheran Church, Vallonia, IN

Learn more about Trinity:
On the Web: http://www.trinityvallonia.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TrinityVallonia
Twitter: @TrinityVallonia
Find our sermon podcasts through iTunes (Search “Trinity Vallonia”)
or at http://trinityvallonia.podbean.com/

Psalm 21: The King Rejoices in the Lord’s Strength

(13 verses, 0:40 to read)

READ and LISTEN

What I am about to READ

Psalm 21 is a psalm of David that gives thanks to God for establishing the strength of the king, which is the strength of the Lord.

MARK and LEARN

The king in this psalm is first and foremost King David, whom God set on the throne of Israel. God worked salvation for David not only in matters of the nation of Israel, establishing rule and peace for David, but also working eternal salvation through God’s promises to David.

This psalm according to Luther is a “prophecy of the kingdom of Christ” (Psalms with Martin Luther p. 29, CPH, 1993.  As this psalm exalts God who makes the king blessed forever it would make sense that this would also be speaking about the coming Christ and his rule over all the earth by grace.

The Lord’s “enemies” (vs. 8) will be swallowed up in the Lord’s wrath, prophesying that great day of the Lord’s return to judge the living and the dead.

MEDITATE

Lord God, come and vindicate your people who trust in you.  You are the King of Glory O Christ, you are the Everlasting Son of the Father. Destroy your enemies who exalt their own wisdom and strength and oppress those who trust in your cross.  Amen.

Peace,

Pr. Ross

Psalm 19: The Treasure of the Lord’s Instruction

Reposted from Pastor A. Brian Flamme

(14 verses, 1:22 to read)

LISTEN | READ

What I am about to READ

  • The works of the Lord are known both through the testimony of nature and the Torah. The Torah reveals both God’s demands of righteousness through the Law and hope of deliverance from sin through the Gospel.

MARK

  • The Testimony of Nature (1-6)
  • Meditation on the Treasure of the Torah (7-11)
  • Prayer for Atonement (12-14)

LEARN

  • What can we learn about God from the heavens and sky? We learn that he is glorious and mighty. Only a fool can look at these wondrous sights and say, “There is not God” (Ps. 14:1). The voice of God’s working in the world goes throughout the world. Only a liar can deny it. But what can we say about this God outside of his glory and might? How does he feel about us? His Word, his instruction, teaches us that his demands are both beautiful and terrible. They are righteous and they condemn our unrighteousness. Thus, we are left with no other recourse but to pray for salvation from sin as David teaches us at the end of the psalm.

MEDITATE

  • Why does David ask, “Who can discern his errors?” What does this teach concerning the problem of sin’s corruption?
  • When we pray against sin, we are praying for Christ. We pray that we would see Jesus and his atoning sacrifice that quenched God’s wrath against our errors and hidden faults.

Thoughts? Comments? Questions? Post below, or join the conversation in our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dailybiblemeditation/

-Pastor A. Brian Flamme